Activity

Report on a poster presentation and symposium at the 59th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Association of Educational Psychology

Poster presentation:
"Can regulatory fit improve performance? With a focus on academic performance in daily settings"

Topic provision at symposium:
"Possibility for the future of research on learning motivation from the viewpoint of regulatory fit theory"

From October 6 to 9, 2017, we participated in the 59th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Association of Educational Psychology held at the Nagoya Congress Center in Nagoya City, Aichi Prefecture. There we gave a poster presentation and presented a topic at the symposium. After arriving in Nagoya on October 5, one day before the event and the most freezing day of the season, I immediately went to enjoy the signature dish of Nagoya, Miso Nikomi Udon, or broth-simmered udon noodle soup. The dish is special in using the variety of mame (soybeans) miso manufactured and consumed mainly in the Chukyo region, which includes Aichi Prefecture. The noodles are cooked to have a unique hardness different from typical udon noodles.

 

In the courtyard of the event venue, the Nagoya Congress Center, there was a replica of the statue of a horse that the great Leonardo da Vinci of the Italian Renaissance had tried to complete (this is called a work of illusion). The surviving manuscripts and drawings discovered in 1967 were used as references. After a clay model of as small a size as two meters had been created, it was enlarged by computer and completed using reinforced plastics. I was deeply impressed by this replica, which was created by Japanese research and technology and was unique to the world.

 

The Nagoya Congress Center is designed in the motif of a swan taking flight, and our poster presentation was held in the Swan Hall. The presentation was titled, "Can regulatory fit improve performance? With a focus on academic performance in daily settings," under the joint names of fellow researchers, Mr. Nagamine, Ms. Tang, Mr. Miwa, Mr. Kurozumi, and Dr. Aikawa. Although it has already been reported that performance can be enhanced through the experience of regulatory fit (e.g., Toyama et al., 2017), no research has studied whether the same effects can be observed for academic performance (e.g., test results, scores). Therefore, we investigated the impact that regulatory focuses would have on academic performance (scores of regular tests) from the viewpoint of regulatory fit. As the result, we showed that academic performance in daily settings can also be improved through regulatory fit.

 

Many researchers and school teachers came to our poster presentation, who enabled us to enjoy fruitful discussions embracing various points of view. We especially appreciated the valuable opinions and suggestions of those from schools, which made our presentation even more successful. I could confirm that our research should be able to provide useful knowledge for teachers and schools.

 

In addition, at the symposium planned by the preparation committee entitled, "Future of research on learning motivation: Trend and future of educational psychology studies," we provided the topic of "Possibility for the future of research on learning motivation from the viewpoint of regulatory fit theory." At the symposium, we introduced some research studies we had done at CRET, where we again got a great response.

 

The theme of this meeting was "Sound theories that enrich practices." In order to provide useful knowledge for practices, sound theories and solid data must be essential. We are convinced that the regulatory focus theory and regulatory fit theory we employ are fascinating theories that can contribute to practices by teachers and schools. Although many challenges remain, we aim to overcome them one by one and proceed with our research to provide useful knowledge for practices.

 

"Can regulatory fit improve performance? With a focus on academic performance in daily settings"

"Possibility for the future of research on learning motivation from the viewpoint of regulatory fit theory" (Miki Toyama, Masato Nagamine, Li Tang, Shuhei Miwa, Ryo Kurozumi, and Atsushi Aikawa)

 

(Miki Toyama, CRET Researcher)


Miki Toyama

CRET Researcher / Associate Professor of Faculty of Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba

Hobbies: Ttraveling (to hot springs)

Research topic: I conduct research on how self-cognition influences motivation, performance, and mental health.
http://www.u.tsukuba.ac.jp/~toyama.miki.ga/index.html

dissertation

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This laboratory conducts research on test evaluation and analysis. We also perform joint research and exchange programs with overseas testing research institutes.







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Professor,
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Ph.D. in Psychology

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