Activity

Report on a presentation at the 33rd National Convention of Japan Society for Educational Technology
"Using Self Video to Improve a Presentation in English – Difference between Ways to Point out"

I attended the 33rd National Convention of Japan Society for Educational Technology held in Shimane University in September 2017. In this convention, I gave a presentation titled, "Using Self Video to Improve a Presentation in English - Difference between Ways to Point out."


We get opportunities to give presentations in various situations, such as at schools and in businesses. Watching video recordings of one’s own presentation is one method for improving presentation skills. Modelling is one of the effects expected through watching video recordings (Bandura, 1969), which reflects the idea from social learning theory that one can learn through observing others. With the advancement of media, modelling has become possible through video recordings. Self-modelling (Dowrick, 1983) is also possible instead of modelling others.


According to current research, watching video recordings of yourself in pairs is more beneficial in various aspects than watching them alone. This study is a comparison of the benefits of receiving exclusively positive feedback with the benefits of receiving feedback exclusively on points for improvement, under the assumption that feedback from a paired partner is beneficial for improving presentation skills.


Sixty university students were divided into two groups. One group consisted of 15 male and 15 female students who received only positive feedback, whereas the other group consisted of 15 male and 15 female students who received feedback only on points for improvement. After all students gave presentations in English, they watched the videos recorded on smartphones in pairs. Two video recordings were made for each presentation—one practice performance and the actual performance, and each student self-evaluated about 18 items of their presentation.


The self-evaluation scores of the group who received only positive feedback were significantly higher in some items. Furthermore, I observed an increase in the number of items where the self-evaluation scores of the actual performance were higher than those of the practice performance. An analysis of these results including those of free descriptive questionnaire suggests that the objectives and results of receiving positive feedback differ from those of receiving feedback on points for improvement. Receiving positive feedback evokes feelings of praise and improves confidence, whereas receiving feedback on points for improvement may not affect feelings such as confidence, as the feedback is about the presentation itself. Of course, some people may feel uncomfortable receiving feedback on points for improvement. In addition, some people seem to be hesitant to indicate points for improvement for others, possibly due to the personality characteristics of those who live in Japan.


In order to improve presentation skills, it is essential to present with confidence, acknowledge points for improvement, and correct those points. As the next challenge, I will investigate how and about what the two partners should give feedback to each other.


I received advice not only from many professors at the convention, but also from members of other industries. I would like to thank all members involved in this convention.

 

(Terumi Kobayashi, CRET Researcher)


Terumi Kobayashi

CRET Researcher / Lecturer of Faculty of Foreign Studies, Kyorin University

dissertation

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